Kenny Napper

Composer and Arranger

Kenny Napper

Composer and Arranger

Kenny Napper

Composer and Arranger

Kenny Napper

Composer and Arranger

“It don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing”


Duke Ellington

Bio

Omhoog-Kenny
Kenneth “Kenny” Napper (born July 14, 1933 in London) is an English jazz double-bassist. Napper started out on piano as a child and picked up bass as a student at Guildhall School of Music. He entered the British military in the early 1950s, playing with Mary Lou Williams in 1953 during a leave period. After ending his term of duty, he played with Jack Parnell, Malcolm Mitchell, Vic Ash, and Cab Calloway. He was the house bassist at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club for several years and played with many British and American jazz musicians in the late 1950s and early 1960s, including Alan Clare, Ronnie Scott, Stan Tracey, Tubby Hayes, Tony Kinsey, Tony Crombie, Jimmy Deuchar, John Dankworth, Pat Smythe, Phil Seamen, Zoot Sims, Carmen McRae, and Paul Gonsalves. Later in the 1960s he worked with Ted Heath, Tony Coe, John Picard, and Barney Kessel, as well as with Gonsalves, Tracey, and Dankworth. In 1970 he played with Stephane Grappelli and moved to Germany, playing with Kurt Edelhagen from 1970 to 1972. While in Germany he focused more on composition and arrangement; later in the decade he moved to the Netherlands, where he arranged for radio ensembles. “Kenny Napper”. The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz. 2nd edition, ed. Barry Kernfeld.
Kenny

Kenny Napper Composer and Arranger

I was born in London 1933, and aged 12, went to a school with two 
music teachers, a choir and an orchestra. 
I played the piano, and the viola in the orchestra. 
In one memorable concert we played 1st Brandenburg concerto of 
Bach, a truly life-changing experience. 
I fell in love with Jazz as a teenager and because I have a natural bass ear, 
I became a bass player. 
In 1969 I decided to give all my attention to composing and arranging. 
Making music with the Kurt Edelhagen Band an the Skymasters and the 
Metropole Orchestra in Holland. 
Duke Ellington said: “It don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing”, and 
this light hearted song title is both fun and a deeply serious truth.

Kenny Napper

My Work

1960’s Composition

1970’s Compositions

1980’s Compositions

1980’s Standards

1980’s Standards

1990’s Standards

1990’s Compositions

Just-Like-A-Woman
In 1966 Kenny Napper composed the music for Robert Fuest’s first feature film Just Like A Woman with Wendy Craig and Francis Matthews.
If you want to see the movie, just click on the link:
Just Like A Woman

Contact

Kenny Napper
Vlierbes 20
4007 TE Tiel Nederland